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Latest news & blogs…

Dubai changes company ownership laws

Solicitors Shipleys Tax Advisors

IN A BID to attract wider investment and boost the gulf economies, UAE members have opted to remove one of the main barriers to trade – the requirement for a local sponsor.

Understandably, the changes to ownership laws being introduced across the UAE have received a warm welcome from the business community, who believe it will further facilitate doing business in the country and attract foreign investment.

In today’s Shipleys Tax we look at what’s changed and how it impacts on those looking to trade in the Gulf.

What are the reforms?

The reforms to companies’ law are broadly wide-ranging, but it is the removal of the requirement for a local sponsor for companies that operate onshore that is seen as the biggest potential incentive for investment flows into the country.

For companies that currently have sponsors it will reduce their operating costs and create a more competitive environment, it will further boost the number of onshore companies opening up.

This is part of a giant step forward along a path that the UAE has been undertaking for a number of years, but it is anticipated that this level of rapid change will have a significant impact.

It makes the UAE a much more attractive as a destination for foreign investment.

The removal of the requirement for a local sponsor will give entrepreneurs a greater sense of control over their own business and remove barriers to trade, aligning the economies with that of the UK and others.

It is also likely to provide an overall demand boost for commercial property, which has witnessed a few difficult years since the decline in oil prices which began in 2014.

The changes are part of a package of legislative reforms aimed at ensuring the UAE retains its position as the leading hub for regional and international business.

If you are affected by any of the issues above and would like more information, please call 0114 272 4984 or email info@shipleystax.com.

Please note that Shipleys Tax do not give free advice by email or telephone.

Tax free rental income

Solicitors Shipleys Tax Advisors

WITH MANY now going through job changes and unemployment, renting out a room in your house or flat might be a great way to earn some tax-free income as well as providing an affordable space for someone else in need.

In today’s Shipleys Tax note we look at how renting a spare room in your house can earn you some tax free cash.

What is Rent-a-room relief?

The rent-a-room scheme allows those with a spare room in their home to let it out furnished and to receive rental income of £7,500 tax-free each year without the need to declare it to HMRC. Where more than one person receives the income, each can receive £3,750 tax-free. The limits are not reduced if the accommodation is let for less than 12 months.

Eligibility

The rent-a-room scheme can be used by anyone who lets a furnished room in their own to a lodger. They do no need to own their own home – it can also apply if they rent (but they should check with their landlord whether their lease allows this). The rent-a-room scheme can also be used by those running a guest-house or a bed-and-breakfast establishment and provide services, such as meals and cleaning, as well as accommodation.

The scheme allows those with a spare room to let it out furnished and to receive rental income of £7,500 tax-free each year…

The scheme is not available in relation to accommodation which is not in the individual’s main home or which is let unfurnished.

Automatic exemption

Where the rental receipts are £7,500 or less (or £3,750 or less where more than one person benefits from the rental income), the exemption is automatic. There is no need to tell HMRC about the rental income. Rental receipts are the rental income before deducting expenses, plus any charges made for services such as cleaning or meals.

Using the scheme where rental income exceeds the threshold

The rent-a-room scheme can also be used where the rental receipts exceeds the rent-a-room threshold (£7,500 or £3,750 as appropriate). Where this is a case, the taxable amount is simply the amount by which the rental receipts exceed the rent-a-room threshold. This approach will be beneficial if the rent-a-room threshold is more than actual expenses. However, where using actual figures will produce a loss, it is not beneficial to claim rent-a-room relief as this cannot create a loss and the benefit of the loss will be lost.

The exemption is automatic. There is no need to tell HMRC about the rental income.

Where rental receipts are more than the rent-a-room threshold, a tax return must be completed. If the relief is to be claimed, this can be done by ticking the relevant box in the return.

The election can be made each year, depending on whether it is beneficial to do so.

Example 1

Iqra lets out her spare room to a lodger for £100 a week, earning her £5,200 a year.

As the receipts are less than £7,500, she takes advantage of the automatic exemption for rent-a-room relief. She does not have to declare the income to HMRC.

Example 2

Mary lets out a room in her home for £10,000 a year. She incurs expenses of £1,000 a year.

If she does not claim rent-a-room relief, she will pay tax on her profit of £9,000. However, by claiming rent-a-room relief, she is only taxed to the extent that her rental income exceeds £7,500. She is therefore able to reduce her taxable profit from £9,000 to £2,500 by claiming the relief.

If you are affected by any of the issues above and would like more information, please call 0114 272 4984 or email info@shipleystax.com.

Please note that Shipleys Tax do not give free advice by email or telephone.

Loans to company directors – is it tax free?

Solicitors Shipleys Tax Advisors

IN THESE tough times company profits maybe severely affected but what if your family company is lucky to have cash in the bank? Is there a tax-efficient way to make a short term loan to directors to meet personal bills with a view to clearing the loan with a dividend payment when the business picks up? This can be a tax-efficient strategy, but there are tax pitfalls – in today’s Shipleys Tax note we briefly look at the options.

Tax implications of making loans to directors

Where a family company has cash in the bank but profits have been adversely affected by the pandemic, directors of a family company may wish to take a short term loan to enable them to meet personal bills, with a view to clearing the loan with a dividend payment when business picks up. This can be a tax-efficient strategy, although there are tax implications to be aware of if the loan balance exceeds £10,000, or if the loan is not repaid by the corporation tax due date.

A tax-free loan?

It is possible to enjoy a loan of up to £10,000 tax-free for up to 21 months. To enjoy the maximum tax –free period, the loan must be taken out on the first day of the accounting period. Where the loan is taken out during the accounting period, as long as it is does not exceed £10,000, it can be enjoyed tax-free until nine months and one day after the end of the accounting period.

Provided the loan is for £10,000 or less, there is no benefit in kind tax to pay. But if the outstanding loan balance exceeds £10,000 at any point, the director is taxed on the benefit of the loan.

The dreaded tax charge

To avoid a tax charge, the loan must be repaid within nine months and one day of the end of the accounting period. This is the day by which corporation tax for the period must be due. A section 455 tax charge (named after the legislative provision imposing it) is a charge on the company set at 32.5% of the outstanding loan balance. The charge is aligned with the higher dividend tax rate.

If the loan is cleared by the corporation tax date, there is no section 455 tax to pay. There are various ways in which the loan could be cleared, for example, by declaring a dividend (assuming that the company has sufficient retained profits) or by paying a bonus. However, there will be tax implications of these too. Unless the director can use funds from outside the company to clear the loan or will pay tax on the dividend or bonus being used to clear it at a rate which is less than 32.5%, it may be better to pay the section 455 charge instead.

The section 455 charge is a temporary charge which is repaid if the loan is repaid. The repayment is made nine months and one day from the end of the accounting period in which the loan was repaid, usually be setting it against the corporation tax liability for that period.

However, it should be noted that anti-avoidance provisions apply to prevent a director from trying to clear the loan shortly before the corporation tax due date and re-borrowing the funds shortly afterwards. What mechanisms would work to circumnavigate these provisions are beyond the scope of this tax brief.

Benefit in kind charge

Note that a tax charge will also arise on the director under the benefit in kind legislation if the loan balance exceeds £10,000 at any point in the tax year. The amount charged to tax is the difference between interest due on the loan at the official rate (currently set at 2.25% since 6 April 2020) and the interest, if any, paid by the director. The company must also pay Class 1A National Insurance (at 13.8%) on the taxable amount.

If you are affected by any of the issues above and would like more information, please call 0114 272 4984 or email info@shipleystax.com.

Please note that we do not give free advice by email or telephone.

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