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Contractors/Locums

Majority of those who wish to start contract work want to do so for the perceived tax benefits. Whilst tax savings can be significant given the right advice, those looking to move to self employment need to be wary of the many pitfalls – IR35and status issues, income shifting etc to name but a few.

At Shipleys we will help you make the transition from employment to self-employment as painless as possible. We will deal with all the tax and accounts issues that need resolving and we promise to do it swiftly. We will explain honestly and carefully the pros and cons of self employment/sole tradership v. trading through a company and help you decide the best way for you.

If you are a locum, or thinking about becoming one in the near future, talk to us for clear concise advice – we deal with hundreds of locums/ IT contractors each year.

  • Free contractor/locum start-up advice
  • Paying too much tax? If you haven’t done any planning then you probably are paying over the odds to the Chancellor. Call us for a free tax health-check.
  • Sole trader v. company structure – the pros and cons
  • IR35 – this affects all locums/contractors trading via a company. Is your business contract IR35 proof? How can you minimise the risk? HMRC is continually attacking Personal Service Companies, how can you stay one step ahead?
  • Expenses – are you claiming everything you possibly can?
  • Buying a car – which is the best way, personally or through a company?
  • Fixed fee accounts, tax returns, VAT (if applicable) and Payroll
  • Preferential payment terms can be agreed for start-ups

Latest news & blogs…

Grants for businesses affected by COVID-19

Contractors/Locums Shipleys Tax Advisors

MANY BUSINESSES have been forced to close as a result of the national and local restrictions introduced to slow the spread of Coronavirus. Where this is the case, the business may be eligible for a grant from their local authority. In today’s Shipleys Tax note we look at some options currently available for struggling businesses.

The following grant support is available to businesses in England during the second national lockdown. Grants to businesses in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are subject to devolved rules.

Businesses closed due to national retractions

Business that were previously open as usual, but which were required to close between 5 November 2020 and 2 December 2020 as a result of the second national lockdown in England may be eligible for a grant from their local council for the 28-day period for which the national lockdown applies.

A business may qualify for a grant if it meets the following conditions:

  • it is based in England;
  • it occupies premises in respect of which it pays business rates;
  • it has been required to close between 5 November 2020 and 2 December 2020 as a result of the national lockdown; and
  • it has been unable to provide its usual in-person service from those premises as a result.

Businesses that qualify may include non-essential shops, leisure and hospitality venues and sports centres.

Business that normally operate as an in-person venue but which have had to modify their services as a result of the lockdown also qualify. An example here would be a restaurant that is not allowed to provide eat-in dining but which stays open for takeaways.

Businesses are only entitled to claim one grant for each non-domestic property.

Amount of the grant

The amount of the grant is based on the rateable value of the business premises on the first day of the second national lockdown.

Where the rateable value of the business premises is £15,000 or less, the business will receive a grant of £1,334 for each 28-day period for which the restrictions apply.

Where the rateable value of the business premises is between £15,000 and £51,000, the business will receive a grant of £2,000 for each 28-day period for which the restrictions apply.

Where the rateable value of the business premises is £51,000 or above, the business will receive a grant for each 28-day period for which the restrictions apply.

Applications should be made to the local council following the application procedure on the relevant council’s website.

Excluded businesses

A business is not eligible for a grant if it can continue to operate during the restrictions because the business does not depend on providing in-person services from their premises. Businesses that would fall into this category would include accountants and solicitors.

Businesses that are not required to close, but which choose to, are also ineligible for a grant.

A business which has exceeded the permitted state aid limit – set at €200,000 over a three-year period – is not eligible for further funding but may qualify for help under temporary Covid-19 measures.

Local restrictions

Where local restrictions are in force, businesses may qualify for separate grants if they are either forced to close or, where they can remain open, their business is severely impacted as a result of those restrictions. Details of the grants available where local restrictions apply can be found on the Gov.uk website.

If you are affected by any of the issues above and would like more information, please call 0114 272 4984 or email info@shipleystax.com.

Please note that Shipleys Tax do not give free advice by email or telephone.

Dubai changes company ownership laws

Contractors/Locums Shipleys Tax Advisors

IN A BID to attract wider investment and boost the gulf economies, UAE members have opted to remove one of the main barriers to trade – the requirement for a local sponsor.

Understandably, the changes to ownership laws being introduced across the UAE have received a warm welcome from the business community, who believe it will further facilitate doing business in the country and attract foreign investment.

In today’s Shipleys Tax we look at what’s changed and how it impacts on those looking to trade in the Gulf.

What are the reforms?

The reforms to companies’ law are broadly wide-ranging, but it is the removal of the requirement for a local sponsor for companies that operate onshore that is seen as the biggest potential incentive for investment flows into the country.

For companies that currently have sponsors it will reduce their operating costs and create a more competitive environment, it will further boost the number of onshore companies opening up.

This is part of a giant step forward along a path that the UAE has been undertaking for a number of years, but it is anticipated that this level of rapid change will have a significant impact.

It makes the UAE a much more attractive as a destination for foreign investment.

The removal of the requirement for a local sponsor will give entrepreneurs a greater sense of control over their own business and remove barriers to trade, aligning the economies with that of the UK and others.

It is also likely to provide an overall demand boost for commercial property, which has witnessed a few difficult years since the decline in oil prices which began in 2014.

The changes are part of a package of legislative reforms aimed at ensuring the UAE retains its position as the leading hub for regional and international business.

If you are affected by any of the issues above and would like more information, please call 0114 272 4984 or email info@shipleystax.com.

Please note that Shipleys Tax do not give free advice by email or telephone.

Tax free rental income

Contractors/Locums Shipleys Tax Advisors

WITH MANY now going through job changes and unemployment, renting out a room in your house or flat might be a great way to earn some tax-free income as well as providing an affordable space for someone else in need.

In today’s Shipleys Tax note we look at how renting a spare room in your house can earn you some tax free cash.

What is Rent-a-room relief?

The rent-a-room scheme allows those with a spare room in their home to let it out furnished and to receive rental income of £7,500 tax-free each year without the need to declare it to HMRC. Where more than one person receives the income, each can receive £3,750 tax-free. The limits are not reduced if the accommodation is let for less than 12 months.

Eligibility

The rent-a-room scheme can be used by anyone who lets a furnished room in their own to a lodger. They do no need to own their own home – it can also apply if they rent (but they should check with their landlord whether their lease allows this). The rent-a-room scheme can also be used by those running a guest-house or a bed-and-breakfast establishment and provide services, such as meals and cleaning, as well as accommodation.

The scheme allows those with a spare room to let it out furnished and to receive rental income of £7,500 tax-free each year…

The scheme is not available in relation to accommodation which is not in the individual’s main home or which is let unfurnished.

Automatic exemption

Where the rental receipts are £7,500 or less (or £3,750 or less where more than one person benefits from the rental income), the exemption is automatic. There is no need to tell HMRC about the rental income. Rental receipts are the rental income before deducting expenses, plus any charges made for services such as cleaning or meals.

Using the scheme where rental income exceeds the threshold

The rent-a-room scheme can also be used where the rental receipts exceeds the rent-a-room threshold (£7,500 or £3,750 as appropriate). Where this is a case, the taxable amount is simply the amount by which the rental receipts exceed the rent-a-room threshold. This approach will be beneficial if the rent-a-room threshold is more than actual expenses. However, where using actual figures will produce a loss, it is not beneficial to claim rent-a-room relief as this cannot create a loss and the benefit of the loss will be lost.

The exemption is automatic. There is no need to tell HMRC about the rental income.

Where rental receipts are more than the rent-a-room threshold, a tax return must be completed. If the relief is to be claimed, this can be done by ticking the relevant box in the return.

The election can be made each year, depending on whether it is beneficial to do so.

Example 1

Iqra lets out her spare room to a lodger for £100 a week, earning her £5,200 a year.

As the receipts are less than £7,500, she takes advantage of the automatic exemption for rent-a-room relief. She does not have to declare the income to HMRC.

Example 2

Mary lets out a room in her home for £10,000 a year. She incurs expenses of £1,000 a year.

If she does not claim rent-a-room relief, she will pay tax on her profit of £9,000. However, by claiming rent-a-room relief, she is only taxed to the extent that her rental income exceeds £7,500. She is therefore able to reduce her taxable profit from £9,000 to £2,500 by claiming the relief.

If you are affected by any of the issues above and would like more information, please call 0114 272 4984 or email info@shipleystax.com.

Please note that Shipleys Tax do not give free advice by email or telephone.

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