Let our clients tell you about us

Testimonials

Our knowledge is built upon combined decades of expert experience in tax and accountancy so you can rest assured that the most important of financial decisions are in the most competent hands.

Value of a close relationship

“We value the close working relationship we have with Shabeer and the specialist teams at Shipleys Tax and have found them very knowledgeable, friendly and quick to respond to our queries. Shabeer has attended several of our practice meetings and his advice regarding partnership succession issues has been invaluable. I would highly recommend Shipleys to other GP practices.”

Dr K, GP Surgery – Yorkshire

Fixed fee promise and no surprise bills

“One of the most frequent issues we had with our previous accountants was not being made aware, in advance, of the fees to be charged! Shipleys Tax were a breath of fresh air, always completely transparent. And no charges for any phone calls or meetings!”

FM Medical Practice – Manchester

Partner led client service promise

Accountants seem to promise the earth but don’t deliver do they? Well we found the opposite. Abdul made himself available on so many occasions and even on weekends when we had a really major panic with a sale. Really grateful to him for his advice and foresight. If we needed to talk, they listen. It really is that simple!

Mrs Khan – JL Healthcare

“I came to Shipleys Tax through a personal recommendation, at the time I was in a transitional period. I had already taken some steps towards self-employment, however I had no idea what I was doing and the information I received from others was inaccurate for what I needed… I needed some one to understand and help me resolve all the mess I was creating.

Abdul stepped in just at the right time. He dealt with all the paperwork, as well as giving me valuable advice on how to save tax, which was cool. I felt I was looked after, my needs taken care of without me feeling like being a burden.

I would recommend Shipleys to anyone that wants an experienced professional team, they are always eager to help and support your company and offer advice when needed, but above all they are always willing to go over and beyond expectation every time!”

– Bella

Latest news & blogs…

Taxman’s spy computer checks your Facebook posts

taxman

What with cyber-snooping being all the rage these days it seems the taxman is getting in on the act too.

HM Revenue & Customs has now fully unleashed its super-computer, costing over £100m and many years to make, to identify those who may have paid too little tax.

The powerful system, benignly dubbed “Connect”, now automatically gathers information from a myriad of government and corporate sources to create a detailed profile of each taxpayer’s financial position. Where this differs from the information provided by the taxpayer, the account is flagged up and subject to further possible investigation.

Connect now automatically collects information from over 30 databases, covering details of taxpayers’ salaries, bank accounts, loans, property and car ownership..

 The system’s data-hoarding does not just stop at the income people have received from work and investment. It also amasses data from the digital footprint left by taxpayers online.

 It collates data from diverse sources such as Airbnb and eBay, as well as obtaining anonymised information on all Visa and Mastercard transactions, enabling it to identify areas of likely underpayments which it can then target further.

HMRC also has powers to request one-off bulk data from third parties where there may be particular cause for concern. Insurance companies, hospitals and dentists supplied information to assist with the Tax Health Plan, for instance.

For those with investment properties, it can also access Land Registry records to see houses purchased/sold to check against information on a tax return. In addition, further sources enable it to determine if properties are being rented out and whether that income has been declared. Crucially, it can also determine if someone is likely to be able to afford such properties, or whether they are suspected of having used previously undeclared income or savings.

Particularly striking is the gathering of information from social media. HMRC are now monitoring online posts about holidays, parties and purchases. They may wish to ask questions where they do not feel lifestyle fits with an individual’s reported income.

The tax profession has raised concerns that HMRCs growing reliance on automated systems could mean an increasing number of innocent taxpayers facing investigation. Whilst many of the leads generated by Connect’s data collection maybe worth following up, a proportion will be unfounded causing unnecessary stress and anxiety to those targeted. A surface analysis of data or online information could quite easily lead to misinterpretation. An exaggeration over twitter or Facebook, for example, could paint a highly inaccurate picture resulting in false leads.

Shipleys Tax has many years of protecting taxpayers and succeeding in tax investigations with HMRC, if you need help please contact us 0114 275 6292 or email info@shipleystax.com.

 

What HMRC can find out about you

  • UK & overseas bank accounts, pensions: From 2017 HMRC will receive information from banks in more than 60 countries.
  • Web browsing and email records: Under the ‘Snoopers Charter’ HMRC will be able to access individual’s digital information
  • Property sites -adverts on the internet e.g. Rightmove and Zoopla
  • Land Registry records: To determine properties purchased, stamp duty paid and capital gains tax
  • Earnings: From any employer, including those you have worked for casually, or on an ad-hoc basis. This includes any company benefits received. It can also access child benefit and maintenance payments through the child support agency
  • Internal tax documents: Systems show council tax paid, relevant VAT registration, previous tax investigations, last year’s tax return (or absence of one)
  • Visa and Mastercard transactions: Anonymised information on all payments
  • DVLA: Details of cars purchased and owned by individuals
  • Online marketplaces: Websites such as eBay and Gumtree can be accessed to weed out regular traders
  • Social media: The Connect system can also look at public social media account information, including from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram

 Connect cross-references information from many other UK government databases, including:

  • Council tax
  • Companies House
  • DWP (former Benefits Agency)
  • The electoral roll
  • Gas Safe Register
  • Insurance companies

HMRC also independently looks at Google Earth.

 

Claiming Child Benefit could mean you get more State Pension?

_89067311_thinkstockphotos-491921816

If your child is under 12 and you’re not working or don’t earn enough to pay National Insurance contributions, Child Benefit can help you qualify for National Insurance credits.These credits count towards your State Pension. They protect it by making sure you don’t have gaps in your National Insurance record.

Retirement may be the last thing on your mind when you’re looking after a new baby, but what you do now could have a big impact on your future finances.

Despite what you might think, no one automatically gets the full amount of State Pension when they retire. You’ll only get the full amount if you’ve paid, or been credited with, National Insurance contributions for 35 years.

The key word here is ‘credited’. Even if you’re not working while looking after your baby, you’ll get National Insurance credits when you claim Child Benefit until your youngest child is 12. The credits are automatically added to your National Insurance account when you claim Child Benefit, so you don’t need to do anything.

For more information please contact us on 0114 275 6292 or info@shipleystax.com.

Finance Bill 2016 receives Royal Assent

images

The Finance Bill 2016 finally received Royal Assent on 15 September, enacting proposals announced in the 2016 Budget, Autumn Statement 2015 and Summer Budget 2015. Amongst other things, Finance Act 2016 includes provisions relating to income tax rates and allowances; restrictions on tax reliefs for travel and subsistence expenses (in effect since April 2016), the reduction of the lifetime allowance on pension contributions from £1.25m to £1m (again, effective from 6 April 2016); and the reduction in the main rate of corporation tax to 17% for financial year 2020.

The Act is based on George Osbourne’s final Budget. The annual Finance Bill usually receives Royal Assent in early to mid-July. This year’s extensive delay has been largely blamed on the Brexit referendum followed by the summer parliamentary recess.

The Finance Act 2016 can be found online here or alternatively you contact us for more information.

Load More Posts

Testimonials

Contact us

  • info@shipleystax.com
  • 0114 275 6292
  • Wharf House, Victoria Quays,
    Wharf Street Sheffield,
    S2 5SY

Still have unanswered questions? Let us answer them for you.

Contact us